Saturday, September 28, 2013

And this is from the guys whose decision to support HTML5 doomed Flex and Silverlight?


Bad news: iOS 7's HTML5 is full of bugs
http://www.infoworld.com/t/html5/bad-news-ios-7s-html5-full-of-bugs-227685

Saturday, September 14, 2013

No news is NOT good news....

Great post from Displaced Guy on the status, or lack thereof, of PB15.    A few items worth calling to attention and commenting on.

"I REALLY feel bad for Sue Dunnell, Bruce Armstrong and others at SAP who have an genuine interest in PowerBuilder and are class-act individuals but SAP is playing them like a violin like they are to us.  My displeasure with SAP is in no way directed towards any employee of SAP other than those who are responsible for the decisions at a very high level."

Perhaps it's just me, put the first sentence in this quote could imply that I work for SAP.  It references Sue Dunnel (who works for SAP), myself and "others at SAP".  They may be playing me like a violin, but I don't work for SAP.

"The reality is that to this day there really isn’t a perfect replacement for PowerBuilder and it is too bad that SAP doesn’t see this.  Moving a large complex PB application to any of the competing technologies is no trivial task and has proven to be extremely difficult and expensive with many failures (projects canned because they made no progress) when going to both .NET and Java.  The remaining legacy PB applications would cost millions to redevelop. There are some really huge, robust and mission critical legacy PB applications in the corporate world, one that comes to mind was developed by Perot Systems many years ago and is still used by many health care companies.  It would take years to redevelop at a cost in the millions.  The amount of time needed to redevelop in something like .NET would be much longer than the original application took.  Why are legacy PB applications so difficult to redevelop. One obvious answer is the datawindow or lack of a datawindow replacement which is what made PB one of the most capable tools for developing business applications."

Great points, the real crux of the problem, and the best summary of the situation I've seen to date.

"We are set to surpass rates of $100/hr (to the developer) as early as 2014 at the current pace, for a senior developer."


Well, they say ever cloud has a silver lining.  When I'm wearing my "somebody that has to find and hire PowerBuilder developers" hat this would be bad news.  But when I'm wearing my own "PowerBuilder developer" hat, it sounds pretty good to me.  ;-)